Sad Boys Ventures into the NFT Space to Raise Awareness about Suicide and Promote Mental Health

Non-fungible tokens, a form of digital asset that has taken the industry by storm this year, continue to make a buzz, thanks to the flood of individuals and companies armed with their signature collections. With its growth unprecedented and astronomical, NFT is expected to stay in the limelight because of the value it offers to artists, creators, and institutions from various fields. Not only do NFTs provide a new way of making money by digitizing goods, but many have also found them ideal for tracking and verifying the authenticity of certain assets. However, the allure these blockchain-hosted non-interchangeable units of data hold doesn’t only rest on their financial perks. Purpose-driven go-getters are now wielding their considerable power to make a difference, raise awareness about issues that matter today, and inspire change. Among those who are capitalizing on NFTs for a good cause are the strategic minds behind Sad Boys.

“It’s okay not to be okay. You are not alone.” Sad Boys is known for this hard-hitting motto. A collection of 5,000 unique non-fungible tokens, this new set of participants into the Ethereum blockchain was created in recognition of the more than 700,000 people who die due to suicide every year. Widely considered one of the most serious, this global public health issue emerged as the fourth leading cause of death among teenagers and young adults in 2019. To this date, it still affects countless families and communities all over the globe. 

Highly fueled by the mission to promote suicide and mental health awareness to a space that has gained a significant stronghold not only in the financial realm but also in the general population, Sad Boys brings to the table the much-needed message that individuals who are suffering from any kind of distress are not alone. Furthermore, by venturing into the world of NFT, the dedicated team at the helm of the collection also hopes to highlight the importance of establishing safe places where people can talk to each other and encourage one another. 

Sad Boys, whose minting day is scheduled for October 22, is religiously adhering to a clear-cut roadmap. After its launch, it plans to donate $50,000 to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, a New York-based voluntary health organization that shed light on mental health issues and provide resources and aid to those affected by suicide by funding scientific research, offering educational programs for professionals, educating the public about mood disorders and suicide prevention, promoting policies and legislation, and delivering programs for survivors. 

On top of contributing to the cause financially, Sad Boys wishes to start an exclusive club that will bring together influencers in the mental health space, advocates, and, most importantly, those afflicted. Moreover, it aims to acknowledge the support of SadBoyNFT holders by gifting them with upcoming rare features. 

Characterized by their classic pixel style, the characters under the Sad Boys collection have had no trouble capturing the interest of NFT enthusiasts. But, while it is undeniable that the distinctively sad appearances of its art pieces are to be credited for the attention they’ve been gaining, it is also inarguable that they have managed to hog the spotlight because of their overarching goal to create a safe space for individuals going through hardships. 

Learn more about Sad Boys by visiting its website. More information about SadBoysNFT can also be found on its Instagram page.

Brittany Meyers

Brittany Meyers is a Digital Content Officer at US Reporter. She has spent her entire career helping out entrepreneurs across different industries to push their campaigns. She specializes in marketing and sales being the pillars of every business.

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